About the Toyota Fiasco and the accelerator sticking, Does anybody know if the Smart have anything to eliminate this problem?  Mercedes has had a brake over-ride system for several years.

Tags: Brake, accelerator, disengage, the

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Shifting to neutral is the best thing to do since you still have the engine running, so you get the benefit of the power steering (like the Smart needs that), and the brakes assisted by the engine.

As I said before, the engine will not over-rev as the computer will prevent that from happening.
Jim Yedor said:
Turn off the engine. Use the key and shut it off. End of story. Besides- "Sudden acceleration" in a smart might be a refreshing change!
do not turn off the engine. but do put the trans in neutral. By turning off the engine you lose power steering and power brakes, needed to control your Smart. Some of the Toyota drivers should have known this. Basic driving 101.
Mr. Bauer --- Most of the response I received is the same thing, shift into neutral, and don't worry about the engine racing, because it has a governor on it, thank you
Fred Bauer said:
As an interesting side note, the Maryland Drivers Test has the question "What should you do if the accelerator sticks?" The correct answer is "Shift to Neutral."

This was on the test long before Toyota's problems became news.
Thank you for your reply, but I thought there is a governor that keeps the RPM from overdoing it. Top speed is 85 mph. Thank you

Ryan said:
Yeah.... but doing that isn't the greatest thing either, jwight. it IS a manual... but shifting it into neutral would pretty much automatically make the rpm's peg at the top... unless they have a safety shut-off if such a situation came up.
A clutched vehicle like the smart does not "shift" into neutral... it disengages the clutch.... shifting into neutral is an automatic transmission action.

Alexander Palasz said:
Thank you Mr. Lewis, putting the transmission into neutral seems like the only thing I can do, and I think you're right about the brakes on a smart, they work real well, should be able to stop the car at any speed.

It seems to me that I read somewhere that when you're standing in a light, and you press the brakes real hard, the transmission goes into neutral. I don't remember where I read that. But I will try it next time I'm standing. Thank you. Alex
huh? i had many manual tranny cars and would always pop them into neutral to coast, and then would pop them into the appropriate gear to resume acceleration, the smart does the same thing, it tries to find the right gear when moving and match the engine speed before engaging the clutch, it doesn't make the same choice of gear that i would. and i would always park my older cars in neutral, so i wouldn't have to press the clutch when starting. that's one of the things i hate about the smart, it shifts sequentially, in my older cars i'd go 1st, 2nd then pop into 5th @ 35mph, you have to hit all the gears in the smart
I don't have power steering in my Cabrio and a smart doesn't need it. As to power brakes, also not needed to stop the car. We are talking adults here, right?
I was just joking to my wife, who drives a Toyota, that the LAST thing I have to worry about with the smart is "sudden" acceleration. And even if it did happen, I'd have much more time on my hands to decide how to handle the situation.
It's another safety feature of our smarties !!!
Jim.
"do not turn off the engine. but do put the trans in neutral. By turning off the engine you lose power steering and power brakes, needed to control your Smart. Some of the Toyota drivers should have known this. Basic driving 101."

Here's a little experiment every smart owner can do themselves. Find a small stretch of open road. At around 40 mph shift into N and turn off the engine. Steer the car to the side of the road and apply the brakes to bring the car to a stop. Steers fine. stops fine. If it was a Mustang or similar heavy car then power steering is helpful but not critical. Power brakes/ power assist help a great deal as well. But it is a smart car and weighs vey little. It steers and stops without any power assist just fine.
Why do people compare apples to oranges and think their statements are right!
OUR power steering is ELECTRIC and not hydraulic like the Mustang you compare it to.....

Jim Yedor said:
"do not turn off the engine. but do put the trans in neutral. By turning off the engine you lose power steering and power brakes, needed to control your Smart. Some of the Toyota drivers should have known this. Basic driving 101."

Here's a little experiment every smart owner can do themselves. Find a small stretch of open road. At around 40 mph shift into N and turn off the engine. Steer the car to the side of the road and apply the brakes to bring the car to a stop. Steers fine. stops fine. If it was a Mustang or similar heavy car then power steering is helpful but not critical. Power brakes/ power assist help a great deal as well. But it is a smart car and weighs vey little. It steers and stops without any power assist just fine.
Just switch OFF the key. Most of us don't even have E-power steering (dont need it), the power brake is also electro-hydrolic and as soon as the key is in the OFF position the clutch dis-engages.

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