Another electric drive owner has put their range to the road trip test. Blogger ElectraGirl had a free weekend to leisurely explore, so she decided to see how far a single charge could take her. And her smart literally went beyond her expectations, traversing mountains, rivers and state lines before capping out at 110 miles. Read more about her adventure here: http://smart.cr/1GFCHjU

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Very interesting write up.  Thanks for posting it.

Thanks for sharing this. I have been tempted to do this myself but without a quick way to charge and keep going (or tow) I haven't tried it (yet).

Also, I wonder how much damage this does to the battery? I doubt that it would do any measurable harm but probably not a good idea to do too often.

Reminds me of the Seinfeld episode where Kramer takes a test drive to the limit...below E.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TuEdU_lrtZk

Well, that's half the range of a Tesla Model S for a lot less money....

You beat me but I am still amazed I got 91.6 miles on a single charge. Most of these miles were for my daily commute which is hilly and average speed of about 40 mph. Even with the hills, I managed to get ECO score to 100% most of the time (it is tricky getting up hills without using over 50% of the power).

I won't be doing this test again but I did need to get an idea how far I could go under nearly ideal conditions.

My next test is going to be high speed miles (55 to 65 mph most of the way). I need a range of at least 60 miles at high speed. I'm optimistic.

I am glad the guess-o-meter underestimates actual range (I believe they are just giving you range to SoC of 20%) but I really wish there were an app that calculated the range based on a predefined route. This app could take into account the speed limits along the route, hills, time of day, temp controls (with and without), intersections and other factors that strongly influence actual range. Does anyone know what the Locations / Range feature in the vh.smart.com app takes into account? 

Amazing little car (the dealership calls it a glider).

With all this info, you could write a blog post on range, too! We are checking in with our product specialists to see what factors are taken into account for vh.smart.com app.

Hi Ken. To answer your question, it does not damage the battery to completely drive it to zero. 

I have completed my high speed trip. I was shocked ;-) how well the car did. I will start a separate post with all the details but I just wanted to say that based on this trip I believe the Range app drastically underestimates the available range. The Range app said I wouldn't make it but I finished the 57.5 mile trip with 25 miles to spare!!!! I wish I could trust the Range app but at this point I can't. I believe the EV Trip Planner does a much better job but they don't have a smart car option so I estimated using the Nissan Leaf option and total energy used.

Nice article. thanks for sharing this.



Ken Gish said:

Thanks for sharing this. I have been tempted to do this myself but without a quick way to charge and keep going (or tow) I haven't tried it (yet).

Also, I wonder how much damage this does to the battery? I doubt that it would do any measurable harm but probably not a good idea to do too often.

Lithium-Ion and Lithium-polymer batteries NEVER "discharge" completely.  That destroys them for good.  The control IC for any of them, including this one I assume, discharge the cells to about 50% of a full charge, then cut you off, like your iPhone does when you need it most.  So, 0% "charge" is only half discharged to protect the battery from its dirty little technology secret.  To discharge them is suicide.  That's what the control ICs prevent.  The technology is also limited by the number of deep discharges they will tolerate.  No amount of EV fantasy can overcome this, either.  Sitting on my bed is an old Gateway laptop I'm not sure how old it is.  It spent most of its life plugged in on my desk before becoming the bedtime movie machine on my home's LAN.  It's very old for a laptop, as is its original battery pack.  Because it has rarely been used on batteries, its Li-Ion battery pack still has plenty of use left....the number of discharges it can tolerate.  Discharging simply kills these batteries that love to "float" on the controlled charger, not an issue in a car.

You speak of another suicide for batteries, including these....quick charging.  The control IC also prevents these packs from charging too quickly, which WILL, not may, cause them to overheat, warp plates, cause explosive shorts when the plates touch, boil electrolytes and burn the house down from the fire in the garage.  Recharging an EV in 5 minutes is simply a pipedream.  P, power in watts equals Volts (total pack voltage) X charging amps is physics, not fantasy.  Charging any battery makes them HOT.  Quick charging makes them TOO HOT!  The trick is to balance how fast they will tolerate charging with how long you wish the pack to last.  Charge them slowly, so the heat escapes, they last until their chemistry is consumed by the discharging cycles.  Charge them quickly, the heat takes its toll on the chemistry and physical construction of the pack and really shortens their lives.  Charge them too quickly, they explode impressively:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Tpb-n22Y-sY

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SMy2_qNO2Y0

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